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George Clinton to John Jay, Protection for Towns in the Northeast of the State, May 18, 1779

Letter from Governor Clinton to Congress regarding NY grant disputes approaching crisis

Letter from Governor Clinton to Congress regarding NY grant disputes approaching crisis

New York State Archives, NYSA_A0142-77_2303
 
Document Description
Letter from George Clinton to John Jay, President of Congress regarding protection to towns in the northeast of the State, May 18, 1779.
 
Transcription
Poughkeepsie May 18, 1779
            Inclosed I transmit copies of several papers relative to the disorders which still prevail in the North Eastern parts of this state with request that you will please to lay them together with this letter before Congress.
            From these papers it evidently appears that matters in that quarter are fast approaching to a very serious crisis which nothing but the immediate interposition of Congress can prevent.
            The legislature have from time to time given the most solemn assurances of protection to their will affected subjects and relying upon these promises, the inhabitants of several towns have hitherto persevered in their allegiance to this state. They will not I imagine remain much longer content with mere promises and I daily expect that I shall be obliged to order out a force for their defence. The wisdom of Congress will readily suggest to them what will be the Consequence of submitting this Controversy, especially at this juncture to the decision of the sword. It will not however I trust be imputed to this state that we have precipitately had recourse to coercive measures. We have anxiously expected the Sentiments of Congress upon this important business and it was our earnest wish, that in the mean time the inhabitants on the grants who deny the authority of this state would by a proper conduct on their part have prevented the necessity of force; but justice the faith of government and the peace and safety of society will not permit us to continue longer passive spectators of the violences committed upon our fellow citizens.
                                                                                                I am ???
                                                                                                            Gov. Clinton
His Excellency
John Jay Esq.
President of Congress
 
 
Questions
In the first paragraph what does Gov. Clinton indicate is happening?
 
According to paragraph 2 how serious is the problem?
 
Use textual evidence to tell what the Governor wants to see happen.
 
 
Historical Challenges
Research how interstate disputes are handled by the federal government and states today and compare to the early days of the central administration.
 
 
Interdisciplinary Connections
ELA/Art
Choose a side in the debate to support and create a broadside banner showing why.
 
 
Resources
Kennedy, David M., et al. The American Pageant. Houghton Mifflin: NY, 2002
 
 
Sherman, Michael. Freedom and Unity: A History of Vermont. Barre: Vermont Historical Society, 2004.
 
"Vermont." Worldmark Encyclopedia of the States. Gale, 2007. U.S. History In Context. Web.
 
 

Historical Context
The newly gained independence and self determination of the United States brought to the forefront longstanding domestic issues that were destined to divide the emerging nation. One of the situations involved the land dispute between New York and New Hampshire over the territory that would eventually be the first state created under the new constitution, Vermont.
 
Vermont maintained its mostly independent character throughout the French and Indian War and the Revolution. Powerful political factions such as those backing Ethan Allen and even early settlers in the region viewed themselves as neither part of New York nor New Hampshire. Ultimately Vermonters would become a state in 1791.
 
 
Essential Question
What effects was the Revolution having on domestic policies?