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Letter from Jemima Taylor to Her Mother, Peekskill, September 30, 1777

Letter from Jemima Taylor to her mother

Letter from Jemima Taylor to her mother

Other, USMA_Taylor_002
 
Document Description
Letter from Jemima Taylor to her mother, Peekskill, September 30, 1777.
 
Transcription
Peack Kills September 30, 1777
My der mother thes come to let you know we are all as wall as common but my self and i am better then i was last weak. Samuel is wall and marchs for to joyn Generel Washenton today. He desier me to let you all know whare he was agone. Der mother I wrot the first of this letter last spring and mist sending it and now i have not time to writ but a few lins hoping thay will find you all wall and my poor gustes i long to see him. I want to send him a book but i cant git nothing her now the machent [merchants] are all gon. i send this letter by Docter Standly and i hope you will write to me by him. Know more at presen but i remain your
                                                                                                                                Dafter[Daughter] Jemima Taylor              
 
 
Questions
What did Samuel want Jemima to write to her parents for?
Who delivered the letter for Jemima and why?
Why does Jemima state she can’t send a book to her son gustes (Augustus)?
Explain a possible reason for Jemima’s poor spelling.
 
Resources
Peekskill history at: http://peekskillmuseum.org/about-the-museum/peekskill-history-summary
Peekskill, NY, Revolutionary War history through 1778: Washington situated the headquarters at Birdsall house on Main Street, Peekskill.  The area was a superb hilly defensive location with views of the bay.  Also, the surrounding industries were used for military purposes. “Fort Hill” in Peekskill had five large barracks and two redoubts.  The river fortifications were garrisoned soldiers from Camp Peekskill, and from the forts Independence, Montgomery, Clinton and Lafayette.
A raid resulted in a destructive day as all barracks were burned along with mills, supplies and houses.   The British were held off due to a successful counterattack.  Peekskill was proven vulnerable to attack and West Point became the military command center in 1778. Numerous conspiracy events regarding the Benedict Arnold conspiracy were said to take place in Peekskill, 1780.
 
http://maass.nyu.edu/resources/r1/lesson_plans/work.html - great lesson plan for women work in war
 
 

Historical Context
Historians believe that up to 20,000 women may have marched with the army during the war for independence. If this is true, the female camp population would have been around 3%.  Women joined army regiments for a variety of reasons: protection of violent crimes, fear of starvation, poverty, and loneliness.   Women of the camp were subjected to the same treatment as soldiers under the command of a general.  They could also be expelled for sharing opinions.  Army units located on front lines or in enemy territory accommodated more women than in safer locations.  Perhaps because women in front line battle areas retreated to seek protection with the Continental Army.
 
 
Essential Question
What resources did women use to get messages to men on the battlefield?
 
Check for Understanding
Compare and contrast the two letters from Jemima Taylor (explain using evidence from the documents).  Draw conclusions about what key role she played during the Revolutionary war based on the following statements: “ i sent this by Docter Standly,” “We are so throng with soldgers.”