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Schuyler to the Committee of Tryon County about Indian Affairs, July 4, 1777

Letter Schuyler to the Committee of Tryon County

Letter Schuyler to the Committee of Tryon County

New York State Library, NYSL_SC19811_B1_F13_003
 
Document Description
Letter from Philip Schuyler to the Committee of Tryon County about Indian Affairs, July 4, 1777.
 
Transcription
Albany July 4 1777
Gentlemen
            Your letter of the 2nd Instant was delivered me last Night by Mr. Moore.
            As General Herkimer has made an Agreement with Brandt, and that the letter is gone or going to Onondago I do not apprehend that the Inhabitants at Cherry Valley will be in any Danger from the Indians, more especially as a Treaty is to be held here on the 15th Instant, which the Indians have generally promised [     ] and willing to afford every Assistance in my power, and hitherto it has been effectual for no Mischief, worth mentioning, has as yet been perpetrated in any part of your Country and you may depend upon it that upon no necessary occasion will you [be] left without proper support.
            May God keep you in his protection is the sincere wish of Gentlemen.
                                                Your Friend
                                                            And humble servant
                                                                        Ph. Schuyler
To the Committee of Tryon County
 
 
Questions
Who was worried about being in danger? Why do you suppose they felt this threat?
 
What reason does Schuyler give for the people to not fear the Indians?
 
 
Historical Challenges
Locate Cherry Valley and Tryon County on a historical map.
 
 
Interdisciplinary Connections
ELA: Write a letter from the point of view of an Indian or an inhabitant describing the feelings of being threatened.
 
 

Historical Context
Prior to the American Revolution, Great Britain had adopted a policy of minimal interference with Native American tribes. After the French and Indian War, the British imposed the Proclamation Line of 1763 on the American colonists. This line restricted the colonists from settling west of the Appalachian Mountains, thus minimizing conflicts with Native American groups. Many Native American groups sided with the British during the American Revolution because colonists had repeatedly attempted to settle in Native American territory. The British appeared to be the party more willing to restrict westward movement and preserve the territory of the Native Americans. However, there were some tribes that did side with the Americans.
 
 
Essential Question
Why were some Native American tribes willing to help the Americans during the Revolutionary War?
 
 
Check for Understanding
Students should be able to answer the essential question using evidence from the document.