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The Six Nations Answer General Schuyler's Speech, September 8, 1783

The Six Nations Answer to General Schuyler's Speech, as translated

The Six Nations Answer to General Schuyler's Speech, as translated

New York State Library, NYSL_SC19811_B1_002
 
Document Description
The Six Nations respond to a speech by General Schuyler, September 8, 1783.
 
Transcription
At a meeting of the Chiefs and Warriors of the Six Nations, in consequence of General Schuylers speech, bearing date the 29th July 1783.
            We the Chiefs and Warriors of the Six Nations assembled, acknowledge the receipt of General Schuylers speech to us, in thirty two Days after the date accompanied bya a Belt; which we have duly considered, and return him the following answer.
            We are greatly surprised at General Schuyler telling us that Congress has not yet signified its pleasure to the Commissioners for Indian Affairs on a peace with the Indians, but permit us to say that Congress has already made offers of Peace to us; as well by letters to the Commanding Officer at this Post, as by two principle Commissioners, sent thr’o the Indian Country (who lately left this place) with full Power to treat on that Subject; in consequence of which, many of our Sachems and principle Warriors are gone to meet our younger Brethern the Western and Southern Nations now at Sandusky, earnestly recommending Peace and Friendship, and requesting their acceptance of the terms of Peace offered by Congress; also to entreat them to collect, and cheerfully give the Prisoners, that they may be restored to their respective Families, to which, we make not the least doubt but they will readily agree; as the same has been unanimously agreed upon by all the Six Nations in presence of Sir John Johnson, and the Comand’g Officer at this Post, with many other Officers. Prior to our receiving General Schuylers speech, or sending this deputation to Sandusky, and on the return of our people from this great meeting with our younger Brethern, (whom we expect in a few days) we will then without loss of time dispatch a runner in order to inform General Schuyler the time that the Chiefs will probably be at Oneida.
            But in the Interim we assure General Schuyler that we are hearty and sincere in our Desire for Peace and Friendship with Congress.
            To confirm this our answer we send a Belt herewith.
Niagara 8th Sept. 1783
as translated by the Interpreter
 
 
Questions
Who is at this meeting?
 
What was the purpose of the meeting?
 
Why would they send a belt?
 
 
Interdisciplinary Connections
Art: Create an illustration depicting the meeting.
Art: Design the belt that Native Americans sent to assure General Schuyler.
 

Historical Context
Prior to the American Revolution, Great Britain had adopted a policy of minimal interference with Native Americans. After the French and Indian War, the British imposed the Proclamation Line of 1763 on the American colonists. This line restricted the colonists from settling west of the Appalachian Mountains, thus minimizing conflicts with Native American groups. Many Native Americans sided with the British during the American Revolution because colonists had repeatedly attempted to settle in Native American territory. The British appeared to be the party more willing to restrict westward movement and preserve Native American territory. However, there were some Native American groups, such as the Oneida and Tuscarora, that did side with the Americans.
 
 
Essential Question
Why were some Native Americans willing to help the Americans during the Revolutionary War?
 
Check for Understanding
Students should be able to answer the essential question using evidence from this document.