Annotated Citations

1.  New York State Archives, “Miscellaneous accounts and poems” of residents of  Hamburg, New York who were World War I veterans. File A0412-42.

This file includes the responses of the towns of New York State to a request that they send in materials on their local soldiers to the State. Virtually every county has a file, as do many towns. Our town, East Aurora, is conspicuous by its absence.

2.  Daniel J. Sweeney. (1919) History of Buffalo and Erie County: 1914-1919. Buffalo: The City of Buffalo. 690-691.

This document was a godsend to us.  A little known book in Western New York, it is a goldmine concerning the years it covers.  This was the first document we came across which clearly set-out East Aurora’s role in the war.

3.  US Army. “World Ward I Medal of Honor Recipients.” (Donovan)
http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/worldwari.html  , April 1997.

This website contains all of the Medal of Honor winners in all the wars of the US. It is an official site at the Army Center for Military History and therefore its citations can be trusted more than other commercial sites. These citations were key in understanding what some of the types of combat were in World War I. The accounts are graphic and clear.

4.  Sweeney, 291.

5.  Laurence, Stallings.  (1963) The Doughboys: The Story of the AEF, 1917-1918.  New York: Harper & Row. 375-381.

A good book for a layman’s understanding of what was going on in the war. Written by a World War I veteran, there are a number of interesting stories and interpretations not found in more scholarly books.  This book has one of the best sets of tables we’ve seen in our research when it comes to summarizing statistics and laying out the relationships of various Army units to each other in World War I.

6.  Sweeney, 690-692.

7.  New York State Archives. “Abstracts of World War I Military Service” File B0808.  (Donald Kennedy McCreary)

The series consists of abstracts of military service for New York residents who enlisted or who were inducted into the armed forces of the United States from 1917 through 1919. The record consists of a 4x6” card (or a 5x8” card for Navy personnel) for each individual.

8.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (McCreary)

9.  Frank J. Mackey & Marcus Wilson Jernagan. (1937) Forward March. Vols. I and II. Chicago: Disabled American Veterans of the World War. Pp.48-60.

This two-volume set is a good pictorial review of World War I.  It has an especially strong section on wounded soldiers and rehabilitation. Written just prior to World Ware II it has quite a bit of propaganda concerning Nazism and Communism. In this instance the pictures on pages 48-60 are very clear concerning what boot camp was like. Loaned to us by the Nye family of East Aurora.

10.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (McCreary)

11.  NYS Archives “Abstracts”, (McCreary)

12.  New York State Archives. “New York ‘Boys’ in the War.” File A0412-19, Box 3.  pg. 7.

A report of impressions gathered from sorting and reading soldiers’ letters of the world war during the summers of 1934 and 1935.  This file is a goldmine and should probably be published. It is an incredible assortment of observations about almost every aspect of             war. The best part is that much of the writing tears at the soul and brings a sense of gravity to the reading.

13.  US Army. “World War I Medal of Honor Recipients.” (Stockham)

14.  NYS Archives. “New York State ‘Boys’ ”, p. 18

15.  US Army. “World War I Medal of Honor Recipients.” (Stockham)

16.  US Army. “World War I Medal of Honor Recipients.” (Hayden)

17.  Stallings, 377.

18.  “Final Report of Gen. John J. Pershing” as reproduced in the endpapers of: William E. Moore and James C. Russell. (1920) US Official Pictures of the World War. Chicago: Regsteiner.

This report has been reproduced in a variety of places. It is located at the end of this book, with no page numbers.  It seems it was added as an afterthought. Even so, it is a classic description of the strategies involved in the war and the relations of the Allies.

19.  East Aurora Advertiser. “Donald McCreary Dies in France”. January 16, 1919. P. 1

The Advertiser is our local weekly newspaper. Until now it was not really used for research within the school. This generally because no matter what happens in the world, this newspaper goes on its unflustered, rural way.  This, in fact, became its strength as we studies our town’s involvement in World War I. It reported what was happening in town, as opposed to the rest of the world. The Kaiser never had a chance when it came time to decide whether the Knox’s prize heifer would be on page 1 or a report of German aggression.

20.  East Aurora Advertiser. “Donald McCreary Dies in France”. January 16, 1919. P.

21.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts” (McCreary)

This is an interesting item.  We got into a dare and tried to find 167 Linden in East Aurora.  It isn’t there.  On Linden Avenue the houses start in the 280 range.  We believe the street was re-numbered in the past.  We will find out, or at least raise the question.

22.  Parish Register. St. Mathias Episcopal Church, East Aurora, New York. “Marriages”. Vol. 3. pgs 108-109.

We sent out letters to fifteen churches in the local area asking for their help in locating records on our fourteen soldiers.  Father Hartney at St. Mathias was the first, and only, one to respond.  He allowed us to come over and look at the church records, explaining to us what they meant, and how they could be used.  Father Hartney was pleased to help us since it turns out he is related to the commander of the U.S. “Hat in the Ring” squadron from WWI.

23.  East Aurora Advertiser.  “Bowling Notes”. January 16, 1919.

This had no deep meaning. It was simply meant as a way to compare activities in France where men were dying, to those in our little village at the same time.

24.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts” (Kriedemann)

25.  East Aurora Advertiser.  November 28, 1918. Pg. 1

26.  East Aurora Advertiser, June 27, 1918. Pg. 1

27.  William E. Moore and James C. Russell. (1920) US Official Pictures of the World War. Chicago: Regsteiner. Pp. 566-568

This book was a tremendous help to us.  The photos are clearly captioned, and associated with specific actions or military units.  There is a section on Medal of Honor winners, as of 1920, and a good section on our divisions in the war. Loaned to us by the Nye family of East Aurora.

28.  NYS Archives. “New York State ‘Boys’ ”,

29.  Moore and Russell, 566.

30.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Kriedemann)

31.  Sweeney, 257.

32.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Kriedemann)

33.  NYS Archives. “New York State ‘Boys’ ”, 1-5 passim.

34.  NYS Archives. “New York State ‘Boys’ ”, 1-12 passim.

35.  East Aurora Advertiser. “Somewhere in France”. August 15, 1918. Pg. 6

36.  East Aurora Advertiser. “Somewhere in France”. August 15, 1918. Pg. 6

The local newspaper had a section in which it printed letters from local, soldiers who were overseas.  Due to security precautions, each letter could only be written from “somewhere in France.”

37.  Sweeney, 257.

38.  NYS Archives. “New York State ‘Boys’ ”, pg. 26

39.  Sweeney, 259.

40.  Sweeney, 261

41.  Sweeney, 259-264.

42.  NYS Archives. “Absracts” (Kriedemann)

43.  East Aurora Advertiser, January 9, 1919. Pg. 1

44.  Sweeney, 690.

45.  Stallings, 278-279.

46.  East Aurora Advertiser, January November 21, 1918. Pg. 1

47.  Interview with Helen Clay Natale, niece of Arthur Clay. May 22, 1997.

In response to an article we had placed in the East Aurora Advertiser, Mrs. Natale got in touch with us and offered to bring in some photos for us to look at.  This meeting was important because it was the first “living” connection we had to one of our soldiers.  Her stories were interesting to listen to, and led to good material when we tried to fill-out Clay’s character.

48.  Interview with Helen Clay Natale, niece of Arthur Clay.  May 22, 1997

49.  East Aurora Advertiser. November 21, 1918. Pg. 1

50.  Trenches on the Web. “Posters”. Courtesy of Meehan Military Posters. http://www.worldwar1.com/post006.htm  April 1997.

51.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Clay)

52.  Moore and Russell, 175-177.

53.  “Final Report of Gen. John J. Pershing”

54.  Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society.  Private papers. Diary of Frank Brayman.

Although an American, Mr. Brayman joined a Canadian Regiment early on in the war.  He kept a diary from 1915-1917 of his experiences in the war. Diaries were illegal for soldiers to keep, so there aren’t as many of them as you might think. He was wounded, and after the war found out that his diary was stained and blood encrusted.  Many years later he re-copies his diary, for posterity’s sake.  That copy now resides in the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Museum.

55.  Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society.  Private papers.  Diary of Frank Brayman.

56.  East Aurora Advertiser, November 21, 1918. Pg. 1

57.  East Aurora Advertiser, November 21, 1918 Pg. 1

58.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Kaufman)

59.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Kaufman)

60.  Moore and Russell, 566-567.

61.  Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society. “102nd Trench Mortar Battery:      Autobiography and Troop History by Charles Pearson.” A65-9 Folder 1.

The 102nd Trench Mortar Battery is a very interesting outfit since what happened to them happened to a lot of other outfits also.  A proud cavalry troop, Troop I of the First Volunteer Cavalry, NGNY, this troop went to the Texas border to protect us from Pancho Villa.  Within a year of their return they had been Federalized, shipped to South Carolina, and turned into a trench mortar battery.  They went to France, yet never fired a shot in anger. They returned home heroes all.

62.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Kaufman)

63.  Stallings, 377.

64.  Stallings, 107.

65.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Kaufman)

66.  US Army. “World War I Medal of Honor Recipients.” (Kaufman)

67.  US Army. “World War I Medal of Honor Recipients.” (Kaufman)

68.  Mackey & Jernagan, pg. 176.

69.  Stallings, 98-101.

70.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Kaufman)

71.  NYS Archives. “New York State ‘Boys’ “

72.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Donovan)

73.  Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society. “102nd Trench Mortar Battery...”

74.  Sweeney 199-203.

75.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Donovan)

76.  NYS Archives. “New York State ‘Boys’ ”, pg. 14

77.  Sweeney, 199-203.

78.  “Final Report of Gen. John J. Pershing”

79.  Sweeney, 289-291.

80.  Moore and Russell, 225-232.

81.  East Aurora Advertiser. June 20, 1918. pg. 1

82.  Sweeney, 290

83.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Donovan)

84.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Schurr, A)

85.  East Aurora Advertiser. May 10, 1917. pg. 1

86.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Schurr, A)

87.  Moore and Russell, 28, 36-38, 69-74.

88.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Schurr, A)

89.  Mackey & Jernagan, 363-372.

90.  Aurora Historical Society (East Aurora, New York). “Red Cross Picture Books of WWI Soldiers” (Schurr)

At the beginning of World War the Red Cross mounted an effort to take pictures of each of the local soldiers going overseas. During the war, these pages were augmented by newspaper stories about the individual, or reports from official sources. It was only through this source that we found out the relationship of Alton Schurr to Ralph and Orrin.

91.  “Final Report of Gen. John J. Pershing”

92.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Schurr, A.)

93.  Aurora Historical Society (Schurr)

94.  Aurora Historical (Schurr)

95.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Ernst)

96.  East Aurora Advertiser, August 22, 1918. pg. 1

97.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Ernst)

98.  NYS Archives. “Abstracts”, (Ernst)

99.  Archives. “Abstracts”, (Ernst)

100.  NYS Archives. “New York State ‘Boys’ “, pg. 13

101.  New York State Archives, “Miscellaneous accounts and poems”

102.  Final Report of Gen. John J. Pershing”

103.  Ernst family papers. Cablegram: 8/15/18

The Ernsts also responded to our notice in the local newspaper and were kind enough to send a wide variety of papers to us.  Their daughters attend our high School and we were lucky to have made a connection with them.

Conclusion | Sources Used

Annotated Citations in PDF format (Adobe Acrobat Reader required)